While the world wide web continues to be an amazing resource for information of all kinds, there are still a number of other resources out there that can provide guidance on any number of topics.

In addition to chatting with folks in our community, your friends or your family, local libraries are also still going strong. The written word in non-digital formats, is still one of our favourite ways to explore and consume information, especially when looking for a reprieve from the busy digital space.

With spring on top of mind for everyone here in North America, many of us are switching gears and beginning to think about our spring gardening and the importance of keeping that growth healthy and sustainable. Unless this is your first experience with us here at the Gilligallou Bird, you are already well aware of how seriously we take native plants and grasses and we continue to push that narrative out into the mainstream.

This week Bob took the opportunity to visit his local library in Mississippi Mills to prove that it is more than possible to find solid information about native gardening offline. Sitting down with Monica from the library, Bob went over the importance of native gardening and also explored some of the titles available at most local libraries and what they can teach all of us about our natural world.

 

One particular Canadian author we love would be Lorraine Johnson.  With over three decades of gardening experience under her belt, she specializes in how to best utilize gardens for the benefits of wildlife and nature. Living in an urban center, Lorraine’s yard is limited (so to speak) with regards to size but is increasingly filled with plants designed to benefit the environment by providing food and shelter to insects and wildlife alike.

Living in Toronto, Lorraine is truly an environmental force, often speaking throughout Canada and the United States about native plants and gardening in addition to publishing her popular books on the subject.

Some of our favourites include 100 Easy to Grow Native Plants and The Ontario Naturalized Garden, both of which were available at our local library here in Almonte.

At the end of the day, it matters not where you get your content. The important part of native gardening is simply to start, and your local library is a great place to do just that.

Any questions along your journey?  Feel free to reach out to us directly, we’d love to help!